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Kathmandu Tour

Below are the famous place one shouldn't miss in Kathmandu.

1. PashupatiNath Darshan

  •       Pashupatinath Temple (Nepali: पशुपतिनाथको मन्दिर) is one of the most significant Hindu temples of Shiva in the world, located on the banks of the Bagmati River in the eastern part of Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal. The temple serves as the seat of the national deity, Lord Pashupatinath. The temple is listed in UNESCO World Heritage Sites list.

          The temple is one of the 275 Paadal Petra Sthalams (Holy Abodes of Shiva) on the continent. Over the past times, only born Hindus were allowed to enter the temple. Others could look at it from other side of the river. However, the norms have been relaxed due to many incidents. If the individual is destined, he/she takes and completes the journey to reach these footsteps without any resistance or obstructions along the way, is believed to be under loving grace of Rudra. It is final stage of harsh penance. Thus, the slave (pasu - the human condition) becomes the master (pati - the divine condition). Read More...






2. Swayambhunath Monastry

  •       Swayambhunath (Devanagari: स्वयम्भूनाथ स्तुप; sometimes romanized Swoyambhunath) is an ancient religious complex atop a hill in the Kathmandu Valley, west of Kathmandu city. It is also known as the Monkey Temple as there are holy monkeys living in the north-west parts of the temple. The Tibetan name for the site means 'Sublime Trees' (Wylie:Phags.pa Shing.kun), for the many varieties of trees found on the hill.

          The Swayambhunath complex consists of a stupa, a variety of shrines and temples, some dating back to the Licchavi period. A Tibetan monastery, museum and library are more recent additions. The stupa has Buddha's eyes and eyebrows painted on. Between them, there is something painted which looks like the nose - but is the Nepali symbol of 'unity', in the main Nepali language dialect Read More...






3. Narayan Hity Royal Palace

  •       The name, Narayanhiti, is made up of two words ‘narayan’ and ‘hiti’. Naryan is the name of an incarnation of the Hindu god Vishnu, whose temple is located opposite to the palace. ‘Hiti’ means “water spout” which is also located to the east of main entrance in the precincts of the palace, a landmark that features prominently in local legends.

          The palace compound is located in the north-central part of Kathmandu. It is designed to be a contemporary pagoda with sprawling, park-like grounds covering an area of (30 hectares (74 acres)) all fully enclosed with walls and guarded gates. The current Narayanhiti Palace was built in 1970, replacing the original 1915 building, which had been destroyed in an earthquake. The southern gate of the palace is located at the intersection of Prithvi path and Durbar marg streets. The palace was also the scene of the 2001 Nepalese Royal Massacre. After the 2006 revolution toppled the monarchy, the newly elected assembly declared Nepal a republic and ordered the King to vacate the palace. It has since been turned into a museum. Read More...






4. Bhaktapur Durbar Square

  •       Bhaktapur Durbar Square is the plaza in front of the royal palace of the old Bhaktapur Kingdom, 1400m above sea level. It is one of three Durbar Squares in the Kathmandu Valley in Nepal, all of which are UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

          The Bhaktapur Durbar Square is located in the current town of Bhaktapur,also known as Bhadgoan,[1] which lies 13 km east of Kathmandu. While the complex consists of at least four distinct squares (Durbar Square, Taumadhi Square, Dattatreya Square and Pottery Square),[2] the whole area is informally known as the Bhakapur Durbar Square and is a highly visited site in the Kathmandu Valley. Read More...






5. Dharahara Tower

  •       Dharahara (Nepali: धरहरा), also called Bhimsen Tower, is a nine story (61.88m) tall tower at the center of Sundhara,[1] Kathmandu. It is situated in the historical city of Kathmandu, and is a part of Architecture of Kathmandu recognized by UNESCO. It was built in 1832 by the Prime Minister of the time, Bhimsen Thapa of Nepal. Bhimsen Thapa built the tower under the orders of Queen Lalit Tripura Sundari.

          The tower has a spiral staircase containing 213 steps. The 8th floor holds a circular balcony for observers that provides a panoramic view of the whole Kathmandu valley. The tower has a 5.2m bronze mast on the roof. The tower has been open for the general public since 2005 for a small fee. The present day Dharahara is actually the second such tower made by Bhimsen Thapa. The original Bhimsen Tower was built in 1824 and was 11 stories high, two stories taller than the present day Dharahara. Dharahara was built for Queen Lalit Tripura Sundari, who was the niece of Bhimsen Thapa. She wanted a tower of her own next to Bhimsen's original tower. Read More...